American Academy of Neurology, April 22-28

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The 69th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology

The annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology was held from April 22 to 28 in Boston and attracted approximately 12,000 participants from around the world, including clinicians, academicians, allied health professionals, and others interested in neurology. The conference highlighted recent advances in neurological disorders, with presentations focusing on the diagnosis, management, and treatment of disorders impacting the brain and nervous system.

In the phase 3 EXIST-3 study, David Neal Franz, M.D., of the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and colleagues found that everolimus was associated with a sustained and meaningful reduction in seizure frequency in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) with intractable epilepsy.

"Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, like everolimus, reverse the genetic defect in TSC. Improvement in seizures associated with TSC tied to everolimus treatment was sustained and appears to increase over time. This improvement was most notable in younger patients (i.e., under 6 years of age). Side effects were similar to adverse events reported in other studies of everolimus in TSC," Franz said. "Everolimus is already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat TSC-associated giant cell astrocytomas and renal tumors, and has been shown to improve other manifestations of the disease in the skin, heart, and lung. Affected persons can also expect to see an improvement in epileptic seizures."

The study was funded by Novartis, the manufacturer of everolimus.

Abstract No. 007

In the STRIVE study, Peter Goadsby, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of California in San Francisco, and colleagues found that erenumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, was an effective and safe preventive treatment approach for episodic migraine.

According to Goadsby, erenumab, evaluated at 70 and 140 mg compared to placebo, was associated with reductions in monthly migraine days, increased odds of achieving at least a 50 percent reduction in monthly migraine days, and reductions in days per month using acute migraine-specific medications. In addition, the investigators noted a reduction in migraine impact on everyday activities as well as a reduction in physical impairment, both measured by the Migraine Physical Function Impact Diary. Adverse event rates associated with 70 and 140 mg of erenumab were comparable to placebo.

"The STRIVE study establishes calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor blockade as the first ever mechanism-specific, migraine-targeted preventive treatment approach," Goadsby said.

The study was funded by Amgen, the manufacturer of erenumab.

Abstract No. 001

Mark Stacy, M.D., of the Duke School of Medicine in Durham, N.C., and colleagues found that IPX203 was as effective as traditional and Rytary forms of carbidopa/levodopa in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and achieved similar benefit for eight hours in more than half the patients studied.

"The primary outcome was that IPX203 demonstrated significantly improved off-time when compared to other formulations of carbidopa/levodopa," Stacy said. "Medication adherence is a significant problem in Parkinson's disease. Many patients are taking multiple doses, often three or more for medications for motor disability. If this agent provides motor benefit for six to eight hours, it may allow for fewer doses and fewer drugs for a patient with advanced Parkinson's disease."

The study was funded by Impax Laboratories, which is developing IPX203.

Abstract No. 005

AAN: SUDEP Incidence 1 in 4,500 Children, 1 in 1,000 Adults/Year

TUESDAY, April 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is 0.22 per 1,000 patient-years for children and 1.2 per 1,000 patient-years for adults, according to a new guideline published online April 24 in Neurology to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, held from April 22 to 28 in Boston.

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AAN: Apomorphine May Shorten 'Off' Time for Parkinson's Patients

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Apomorphine may help patients with advanced Parkinson's disease when levodopa stops working, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, held from April 22 to 28 in Boston.

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AAN: Early Research Promising for Immunotherapy in MS

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental immune-system therapy appears safe for patients with progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, and may ease symptoms in some, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, held from April 22 to 28 in Boston.

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AAN: Cannabis-Based Medicine May Help Tough-to-Treat Epilepsy

WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cannabidiol may reduce seizures in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, held from April 22 to 28 in Boston.

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AAN: Females at Higher Risk for Sports-Related Concussions

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Female athletes appear to be more likely than males to suffer concussions during their careers on the field, according to a study scheduled for presentation at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, to be held from April 22 to 28 in Boston.

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AAN: Certain Symptoms Predictive of Worsening MS

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple sclerosis (MS) is more likely to progress to advanced disease among patients who suffer from fatigue and limited use of their legs, according to a study scheduled for presentation at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, to be held from April 22 to 28 in Boston.

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AAN: Mercury in Seafood May Be Tied to Higher Risk of ALS

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of mercury-laden seafood is associated with risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a study scheduled for presentation at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, to be held from April 22 to 28 in Boston.

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AAN: Repeat Head Injuries Do Not Affect Motor Skills in NFL Players

MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Repetitive head injuries may not cause movement disorders for former National Football League (NFL) players, according to a study scheduled for presentation at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, to be held from April 22 to 28 in Boston.

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