Better Information, Smarter Medicine



PAs in PA are out of luck on informed consent

PAs in Pennsylvania are not eligible to obtain informed consent from patients prior to procedures that carry certain risks such as surgery, anesthesia, blood transfusions, and chemotherapy—only physicians are. That's the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania's recent ruling in Shinal vs Toms based on the Medical Care Availability and Reduction of Error (MCARE) Act of 2002. Why? The duty to obtain informed consent belongs solely to the physician conducting the surgery or treatment and cannot be delegated. As a result of this decision, hospitals in the state may revise their informed consent policies. Not surprisingly, the Pennsylvania Society of Physician Assistants is concerned that "the ability for PAs, NPs, midwives and other practitioners to obtain informed consent is in serious question" in the state and beyond.

Source: Pennsylvania Society of Physician Assistants

Is it ever okay for clinicians to disobey?

Employer-imposed rules and regulations for PAs and other clinicians are nothing new. But what happens when an edict goes beyond a minor frustration to something more alarming? If a rule undermines autonomy or has questionable value, clinicians may want to consider just saying no, writes Howard Waitzkin, MD, PhD, in this article. In his case, the impetus for "rebellion" was a required (and unpaid) training related to ICD-10 that he felt promoted "upcoding" that was not in patients' best interest. And so he refused to attend. All worked out in the end (read the full article below to see exactly what unfolded), but Dr. Waitzkin stands firm on disobedience: "Where is the path toward a noncorporatized vision of what we know medicine can be at its best? I don't think that path involves our continuing acquiescence."

Source: Medscape


Most PAs disappointed AAPA won't create certifying body

In last week's Buzz, we shared the latest on the year-long debate between AAPA and NCCPA on PA recertification: AAPA won't create a PA certifying agency as it had suggested it might. Most PAs are disappointed by this news, according to an informal survey we conducted. However, roughly 50% of those who feel let down by the decision aren't surprised things panned out the way they did. Here are the complete results of the poll.

Poll results: Are you disappointed by the AAPA's decision?

Pointers for PAs considering pediatrics

Children are not just little adults—and learning as a PA in pediatrics never stops. These are among the insights PA Marisa Rodriguez shared about what it's like to work in the specialty in this perspective. Beyond the gratification she gets from something as simple as comforting a child or assuaging a concerned parent, Rodriguez emphasizes the wide breadth of services PAs have the opportunity to provide patients. This involves everything from providing routine vaccinations to offering diet and exercise recommendations to combat childhood obesity to supervising infants at neonatal or intensive care units. And the gig might even involve calling upon tips and tricks garnered from practicing in other specialties. In Rodriguez's case, she was able to relieve a distraught child's nursemaid's elbow using a technique she learned in emergency medicine—and the encounter ended with a miniature smile and a relieved mother.

Source: Psychiatric Times

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FROM THE HAYMARKET MEDICAL NETWORK
NAMS issues new guidelines on hormone therapy

The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) recently released an updated position statement on hormone therapy use among postmenopausal women, and the guidelines were published in Menopause. Here's what you need to know:

  • Hormone therapy is the most effective treatment for vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, and evidence shows it prevents bone loss and fracture.
  • The benefit-risk ratio is favorable for women aged younger than 60 years or who are within 10 years of menopause for the treatment of vasomotor symptoms or for women at increased risk for bone loss or fracture.
  • The benefit-risk ratio is less favorable for women who initiate hormone therapy at age 60 or older or who begin therapy more than 10 or 20 years from menopause onset due to greater absolute risks for coronary heart disease, stroke, venous thromboembolism, and dementia.

Source: Endocrinology Advisor





Compiled by Traci DeVito, myCME Managing Editor

To suggest a topic for Buzz or to submit comments, please e-mail editor.myCME@haymarketmedical.com.

This Week's CME Picks for PAs
This Week's Featured Products for PAs

Take $100 OFF Select Self-Assessment CME for PAs
20.00 AAPA Category 1 Self-Assessment CME Credits

Save on select Self-Assessment courses for PAs through 7/31.

Rutgers PANCE/PANRE Review with 90 Days' Exam Master Access
28.50 AAPA Category 1 CME Credits

RECENTLY RELEASED - This 5-module review course is based upon the live course offered by the Rutgers PA Program, with 2500 additional practice questions and 2 full-length practice tests from Exam Master®.

View All Courses

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